World Book Day… I mean week… I mean month!

One of the most AMAZING things about World Book Day is seeing pictures of children ( and some teachers) dressed as the characters from your book. It is so strange that these imaginary people, who for a long time only existed in your head, have suddenly become the favourites of all these young readers. Here are a few of the pictures that were sent to me of various World Book Day costumes. As you can see Malkin comes out on top in terms of who kids like to dress as.

Cogheart World Book Day Outfits

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I have also had a very busy bout of school visits around World Book Week itself, and dotted across the few weeks afterwards. At the same time I have been putting the finishing touches to the copy-edits of Moonlocket and then checking the proofs of that book – which has been hectic to say the least. The book has in fact gone to print today – just in time for the release date. But the Cogheart events that have been wedged in around it have been a lot of fun!

Over the month I have visited ten schools, and I must have done about fifteen talks altogether, because at some schools I did smaller sessions for single classes. I feel quite comfortable now presenting the smaller thirty to sixty sessions. They can be very enjoyable as they are more casual and chatty than larger groups and because there’s a chance in those workshop sized events to do some flip book animation with the kids. But to do three of those smaller talks in a row is tiring. I honestly don’t know how teachers manage a whole day of it! Some teachers and classes who I didn’t get the chance to visit sent me fantastic photographs of the Cogheart inspired activities they’d been up to with their classes too…

 Cogheart Class Activities

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Amongst the ten school I did get to visit, I found myself on occasion doing much bigger events than I’d done before, ranging from 150-200 students. At first this was nerve-wracking, but by the third go I had tweaked the content for that size of audience and felt much happier with the flow of the event. I think it helped that I had a microphone for that final large talk. It really made a difference to how confident I felt about performing. The kids at all the larger talks have all been lovely of course, and a big part of it is getting used to the sea of faces you encounter!

In the end all the different types of talk are worth it, because afterwards you get to meet your readers, discuss their favourite different types of stories, and hear about their enthusiasm for your book. And if they do love the book they will tell you in no uncertain terms how marvellous it is, which is the best thing ever to hear. Here are some pictures from the events of the past few weeks, thanks kindly to the teachers who took them, and to everyone who sent the photographs used in this post.

World Book Week School events

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